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Current Exhibition

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20.01.
Opening

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one by one - entry text

... brings one work by each artist of the gallery on view in the window for a few days

 

#5   Gwen Hardie

9 – 13 Feb. 2021

 

#4   Jörg Gessner

4 – 8 Feb. 2021

 

#3   Thibaut Duchenne

30 Jan. – 3 Feb. 2021

 

#2   Claudia Doderer

25 – 29 January 2021

 

#1   Juliana Borinski

20 – 24 January 2021

... brings one work by each artist of the gallery on view in the window for a few days

 

#8   Birgitte Lund

5 – 9 March 2021

BL gallery one by one

BL short text one by one

BL short exhibition text one by one 2021

‘Birgitte Lund’s canvasses are places where things meet. Acrylic painted areas, pieces of paper, liquid rubber and other fluids – an imprint of organic structure. They meet on the canvas and attempt to unite in a composition; an abstract collage. The works are often constructed around areas that divide the canvas into horizontal bands, as in the series “Psychedelic Landscapes”. Some are immediately beautiful colour compositions in the tradition of Mark Rothko. But strict beauty must be challenged – and it is – with things that don’t fit in – things that are possibly even irritating, ugly and nasty. That’s the way it is with visual dissonance. The dissonances are not, however, allowed to just stand there and irritate. They are made
 to communicate with each other and with the background, by adding new layers and bridges so that balance is restored, but the dissonance remains. As a rule, the dissonances are not this harsh. They function as tension fields in the picture that make its beauty long-lasting.’ (Torben Sangild)

“My work revolves around the discovery of pictorial landscapes – like an archeologist uncovering but in reverse order. The landscapes are built up through many textured layers. Tracks are left behind on absorbent or repellent surfaces. Lines, marks, calcified figures from my graphical sketches, drawings and earlier works form landmarks on the surface.” (Birgitte Lund)

(5 – 9 March 2021)

 

‘Birgitte Lund’s canvasses are places where things meet. Acrylic painted areas, pieces of paper, liquid rubber and other fluids – an imprint of organic structure. They meet on the canvas and attempt to unite in a composition; an abstract collage. The works are often constructed around areas that divide the canvas into horizontal bands, as in the series “Psychedelic Landscapes”. Some are immediately beautiful colour compositions in the tradition of Mark Rothko. But strict beauty must be challenged – and it is – with things that don’t fit in – things that are possibly even irritating, ugly and nasty. That’s the way it is with visual dissonance. The dissonances are not, however, allowed to just stand there and irritate. They are made
 to communicate with each other and with the background, by adding new layers and bridges so that balance is restored, but the dissonance remains. As a rule, the dissonances are not this harsh. They function as tension fields in the picture that make its beauty long-lasting.’ (Torben Sangild)

“My work revolves around the discovery of pictorial landscapes – like an archeologist uncovering but in reverse order. The landscapes are built up through many textured layers. Tracks are left behind on absorbent or repellent surfaces. Lines, marks, calcified figures from my graphical sketches, drawings and earlier works form landmarks on the surface.” (Birgitte Lund)

 

artist's profile

 

(Photo: Stuart McIntyre)

ML exhib text one by one

ML short exhibition text one by one 2021

With basal patterns, materials, and techniques, executed mostly on wood, plaster, and paper, Marc Lambrechts works open views into hidden worlds. The macrocosms of nature, life, and universal space appear in microcosmic correspondences on the manifold surfaces of the paintings. Lambrechts captures the metaphysics of our world with light- handed charm.

The artist summons cosmic visions with the humblest matter: corn husks and banana leaves, bamboo and cement, latex and leather. Surfaces emerge that are never flat; captured energies reverberate in their depths and elevations. Opened up by carefully and precisely implemented scratchings, other surfaces beneath emerge, in a playful tension of the pierced realities of the universe. In the works on paper the fragile, thinned out surface turns into a fluttering veil.

(Andreas Müller, Berlin)

(28 Feb. – 4 Mar. 2021)

 

With basal patterns, materials, and techniques, executed mostly on wood, plaster, and paper, Marc Lambrechts works open views into hidden worlds. The macrocosms of nature, life, and universal space appear in microcosmic correspondences on the manifold surfaces of the paintings. Lambrechts captures the metaphysics of our world with light- handed charm.

The artist summons cosmic visions with the humblest matter: corn husks and banana leaves, bamboo and cement, latex and leather. Surfaces emerge that are never flat; captured energies reverberate in their depths and elevations. Opened up by carefully and precisely implemented scratchings, other surfaces beneath emerge, in a playful tension of the pierced realities of the universe. In the works on paper the fragile, thinned out surface turns into a fluttering veil.

(Andreas Müller, Berlin)

 

artist's profile

TH short exhib text one by one

TH short exhibition text one by one 2021

In her paintings, Tiina Heiska depicts the human condition, our contact with ourselves and existence. Referencing photographic and filmic situations, Heiska’s female figures are mysterious and sometimes troubling. With firm hand, Heiska constructs a dramatic tension. Wide brushstrokes attest to the moment of the painting’s making. Colours are minimal and monochromatic yet intense, they reveal the light in scenes otherwise often pervaded with darkness.
Alice in Wonderland alike – Heiska’s figures, or just the trace of their movements, recall very womanly states. The little girl and the grown-up woman, innocence and sensuality, children’s games and dreams, adults’ fears, desire and fantasies alternate and surprisingly intermingle.

(21 – 25 Feb. 2021)

 

In her paintings, Tiina Heiska depicts the human condition, our contact with ourselves and existence. Referencing photographic and filmic situations, Heiska’s female figures are mysterious and sometimes troubling. With firm hand, Heiska constructs a dramatic tension. Wide brushstrokes attest to the moment of the painting’s making. Colours are minimal and monochromatic yet intense, they reveal the light in scenes otherwise often pervaded with darkness.
Alice in Wonderland alike – Heiska’s figures, or just the trace of their movements, recall very womanly states. The little girl and the grown-up woman, innocence and sensuality, children’s games and dreams, adults’ fears, desire and fantasies alternate and surprisingly intermingle.

 

artist's profile

GH exhibition text one by one

GH exhibition text one by one

Hardie has always been fascinated by the human body, not so much as a physical entity, something to be comprehended as a whole, but rather for one particular aspect: the skin, the surface of the body…
In her more recent work, she has concentrated on the visual appearance of skin, its colour, its translucency, the way it changes in tone, the way it advances or recedes in our field of vision according to the interaction with other colours and / or varying degrees of light and shade … The canvas has become the equivalent of skin. On it, Hardie has carried out in a tightly prescribed formal sequence, painterly exercises in colour, tone, light and shade, using the canvas as a sort of palette on which to mix her paints…
There is a meditative aspect to Hardies work, which is underpinned by a powerful humanistic awareness of the wide spectrum of skin colours that Hardie encounters with her friends, on the streets and subways of New York where she now lives. In other words, these paintings are not simply formal exercises in capturing the complex fluctuations of our perceptions of colours, but a meditation on the incredible richness / multiplicity of humanity and, implicitly, the way that ethnicities are not fixed but fluid…


(Extracts from a text by Keith Hartley, Deputy Director of Modern and Contemporary Art, National Galleries of Scotland)

(9 – 13 Feb. 2021)

 

Hardie has always been fascinated by the human body, not so much as a physical entity, something to be comprehended as a whole, but rather for one particular aspect: the skin, the surface of the body…
In her more recent work, she has concentrated on the visual appearance of skin, its colour, its translucency, the way it changes in tone, the way it advances or recedes in our field of vision according to the interaction with other colours and / or varying degrees of light and shade … The canvas has become the equivalent of skin. On it, Hardie has carried out in a tightly prescribed formal sequence, painterly exercises in colour, tone, light and shade, using the canvas as a sort of palette on which to mix her paints…
There is a meditative aspect to Hardies work, which is underpinned by a powerful humanistic awareness of the wide spectrum of skin colours that Hardie encounters with her friends, on the streets and subways of New York where she now lives. In other words, these paintings are not simply formal exercises in capturing the complex fluctuations of our perceptions of colours, but a meditation on the incredible richness / multiplicity of humanity and, implicitly, the way that ethnicities are not fixed but fluid…


(Extracts from a text by Keith Hartley, Deputy Director of Modern and Contemporary Art, National Galleries of Scotland)

 

artist's profile

JG exhibition text one by one

JG exhibition text one by one

The fascinating presence of hand-made Japanese papers in their highest perfection, with their multitude of finest fibers and their silky webs, is enhanced in Jörg Gessner’s work. The very many transparent layers of paper are combined with one another, without any glue, simply stretched in such a way that they form a whole. Light as the principle subject is captured to make it play, as one would say of a musical instrument, the full scale of possible nuances and depths.
Born in Germany in 1967, Jörg Gessner studied fashion design at Studio Berçot in Paris. His genuine career combining form, material and light began in Milan in 1992, when he specialized in textile design. Throughout a decade, he spent long periods of time in Japan, studying paper and its applications with one of the greatest dynasties of Japanese paper-makers. Gessner is considered today among the most respected experts in Japanese paper. He currently lives and works in Lyon.

 

artist's profile

(4 – 8 Feb. 2021)

 

The fascinating presence of hand-made Japanese papers in their highest perfection, with their multitude of finest fibers and their silky webs, is enhanced in Jörg Gessner’s work. The very many transparent layers of paper are combined with one another, without any glue, simply stretched in such a way that they form a whole. Light as the principle subject is captured to make it play, as one would say of a musical instrument, the full scale of possible nuances and depths.
Born in Germany in 1967, Jörg Gessner studied fashion design at Studio Berçot in Paris. His genuine career combining form, material and light began in Milan in 1992, when he specialized in textile design. Throughout a decade, he spent long periods of time in Japan, studying paper and its applications with one of the greatest dynasties of Japanese paper-makers. Gessner is considered today among the most respected experts in Japanese paper. He currently lives and works in Lyon.

 

artist's profile

TD text one by one

TD exhibition text one by one

Thibaut Duchenne’s photography is precise, uncompromising and sensitive. His work pays homage to nature and rural life. The objects and landscapes he photographs, conquered by rust and dust, are touching even though immortalised in an almost documentary fashion. Photographed without artificial additions, retouches or embellishments, these places move us and remain engraved in our memory.

Thibaut Duchenne was born in the French region of Picardy. After having completed his studies of agriculture he took over the family farm. At the age of 35 his father gave him a camera. From this decisive moment onwards, he started to accompany his daily labour on the farm with a photographic activity. Progressively his photographic work took him further away from the farm, always on the quest for places abandoned by humankind.

 

artist's profile

(30 Jan. – 3 Feb. 2021)

 

Thibaut Duchenne’s photography is precise, uncompromising and sensitive. His work pays homage to nature and rural life. The objects and landscapes he photographs, conquered by rust and dust, are touching even though immortalised in an almost documentary fashion. Photographed without artificial additions, retouches or embellishments, these places move us and remain engraved in our memory.

Thibaut Duchenne was born in the French region of Picardy. After having completed his studies of agriculture he took over the family farm. At the age of 35 his father gave him a camera. From this decisive moment onwards, he started to accompany his daily labour on the farm with a photographic activity. Progressively his photographic work took him further away from the farm, always on the quest for places abandoned by humankind.

 

artist's profile

 

CD Exhib text one by one

CD Exhib text for one by one

How does Claudia Doderer, architect of spaces for contemporary music and ballet, who directed and created stage design for important operas, achieve capturing the early experience of freedom in small formats? There is something touching in her turning away from the power of the cherished scenographic space.Though the base material is still the model board of earlier days, slightly colored, layered in so many different shades of white, what is of interest to Claudia Doderer today is the little, the pure, the contours, the shadow, the cautiously unwieldy, the quiet resistances. See how the white exudes it’s not being at someone’s disposal! But there is also the muffled warmth of a birch veneer, or a sudden red, like a darting flame, a warning. Time and again the unexpected occurs. Something is offset, folded in an unfamiliar way, bent without cause, an outlier to the order. An energy still unknown, something joyfully perturbing announces itself in these objects.

(Extract from a text by Gertrud Leutenegger, 2020)

 

artist's profile

(25 – 29 January 2021)

 

How does Claudia Doderer, architect of spaces for contemporary music and ballet, who directed and created stage design for important operas, achieve capturing the early experience of freedom in small formats? There is something touching in her turning away from the power of the cherished scenographic space.Though the base material is still the model board of earlier days, slightly colored, layered in so many different shades of white, what is of interest to Claudia Doderer today is the little, the pure, the contours, the shadow, the cautiously unwieldy, the quiet resistances. See how the white exudes it’s not being at someone’s disposal! But there is also the muffled warmth of a birch veneer, or a sudden red, like a darting flame, a warning. Time and again the unexpected occurs. Something is offset, folded in an unfamiliar way, bent without cause, an outlier to the order. An energy still unknown, something joyfully perturbing announces itself in these objects.

(Extract from a text by Gertrud Leutenegger, 2020)

 

artist's profile

JB Exhib text for one by one

JB Exhib text for one by one

When she works on photography or cinema, Juliana Borinski never uses a camera or video camera. She creates images that are generally abstract, using photosensitive paper or film directly, in order to explore their inherent aesthetic and technical abilities. What should only be a receptacle for images, its medium, thus becomes the very material of her work.

For the series Between Humiliation and Happiness, the artist reworks a sheet of photosensitive paper that has been previously overexposed, then subjects it to various rubbings and folds before exposing it again on a new sheet. Photographic skeleton-like forms against a black background result from this: a typology of image-less photographs.

Juliana Borinski looks for errors, lacks and chance. She positions herself deliberately at the margins of the systems she uses, visual media, taking care to avoid images in the usual sense and new technologies, favouring the “almost nothing”. This unconventional approach is also apparent in the fact that each work is unique, in an era where copying an element can be achieved with a single click, and when the tools of her trade are photography and film.

(Excerpts from a text by Aurélien Pelletier, translated from the French by Anna Knight)

 

artist's profile

(20 – 24 January 2021)

 

When she works on photography or cinema, Juliana Borinski never uses a camera or video camera. She creates images that are generally abstract, using photosensitive paper or film directly, in order to explore their inherent aesthetic and technical abilities. What should only be a receptacle for images, its medium, thus becomes the very material of her work.

For the series Between Humiliation and Happiness, the artist reworks a sheet of photosensitive paper that has been previously overexposed, then subjects it to various rubbings and folds before exposing it again on a new sheet. Photographic skeleton-like forms against a black background result from this: a typology of image-less photographs.

Juliana Borinski looks for errors, lacks and chance. She positions herself deliberately at the margins of the systems she uses, visual media, taking care to avoid images in the usual sense and new technologies, favouring the “almost nothing”. This unconventional approach is also apparent in the fact that each work is unique, in an era where copying an element can be achieved with a single click, and when the tools of her trade are photography and film.

(Excerpts from a text by Aurélien Pelletier, translated from the French by Anna Knight)

 

artist's profile