Skip to main content

GH exhibition text one by one

Hardie has always been fascinated by the human body, not so much as a physical entity, something to be comprehended as a whole, but rather for one particular aspect: the skin, the surface of the body…
In her more recent work, she has concentrated on the visual appearance of skin, its colour, its translucency, the way it changes in tone, the way it advances or recedes in our field of vision according to the interaction with other colours and / or varying degrees of light and shade … The canvas has become the equivalent of skin. On it, Hardie has carried out in a tightly prescribed formal sequence, painterly exercises in colour, tone, light and shade, using the canvas as a sort of palette on which to mix her paints…
There is a meditative aspect to Hardies work, which is underpinned by a powerful humanistic awareness of the wide spectrum of skin colours that Hardie encounters with her friends, on the streets and subways of New York where she now lives. In other words, these paintings are not simply formal exercises in capturing the complex fluctuations of our perceptions of colours, but a meditation on the incredible richness / multiplicity of humanity and, implicitly, the way that ethnicities are not fixed but fluid…


(Extracts from a text by Keith Hartley, Deputy Director of Modern and Contemporary Art, National Galleries of Scotland)

(9 – 13 Feb. 2021)

 

Hardie has always been fascinated by the human body, not so much as a physical entity, something to be comprehended as a whole, but rather for one particular aspect: the skin, the surface of the body…
In her more recent work, she has concentrated on the visual appearance of skin, its colour, its translucency, the way it changes in tone, the way it advances or recedes in our field of vision according to the interaction with other colours and / or varying degrees of light and shade … The canvas has become the equivalent of skin. On it, Hardie has carried out in a tightly prescribed formal sequence, painterly exercises in colour, tone, light and shade, using the canvas as a sort of palette on which to mix her paints…
There is a meditative aspect to Hardies work, which is underpinned by a powerful humanistic awareness of the wide spectrum of skin colours that Hardie encounters with her friends, on the streets and subways of New York where she now lives. In other words, these paintings are not simply formal exercises in capturing the complex fluctuations of our perceptions of colours, but a meditation on the incredible richness / multiplicity of humanity and, implicitly, the way that ethnicities are not fixed but fluid…


(Extracts from a text by Keith Hartley, Deputy Director of Modern and Contemporary Art, National Galleries of Scotland)

 

artist's profile