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When she works on photography or cinema, Juliana Borinski never uses a camera or video camera. She creates images that are generally abstract, using photosensitive paper or film directly, in order to explore their inherent aesthetic and technical abilities. What should only be a receptacle for images, its medium, thus becomes the very material of her work.

For the series Between Humiliation and Happiness, the artist reworks a sheet of photosensitive paper that has been previously overexposed, then subjects it to various rubbings and folds before exposing it again on a new sheet. Photographic skeleton-like forms against a black background result from this: a typology of image-less photographs.

Juliana Borinski looks for errors, lacks and chance. She positions herself deliberately at the margins of the systems she uses, visual media, taking care to avoid images in the usual sense and new technologies, favouring the “almost nothing”. This unconventional approach is also apparent in the fact that each work is unique, in an era where copying an element can be achieved with a single click, and when the tools of her trade are photography and film.

(Excerpts from a text by Aurélien Pelletier, translated from the French by Anna Knight)

 

artist's profile

(20 – 24 January 2021)

 

When she works on photography or cinema, Juliana Borinski never uses a camera or video camera. She creates images that are generally abstract, using photosensitive paper or film directly, in order to explore their inherent aesthetic and technical abilities. What should only be a receptacle for images, its medium, thus becomes the very material of her work.

For the series Between Humiliation and Happiness, the artist reworks a sheet of photosensitive paper that has been previously overexposed, then subjects it to various rubbings and folds before exposing it again on a new sheet. Photographic skeleton-like forms against a black background result from this: a typology of image-less photographs.

Juliana Borinski looks for errors, lacks and chance. She positions herself deliberately at the margins of the systems she uses, visual media, taking care to avoid images in the usual sense and new technologies, favouring the “almost nothing”. This unconventional approach is also apparent in the fact that each work is unique, in an era where copying an element can be achieved with a single click, and when the tools of her trade are photography and film.

(Excerpts from a text by Aurélien Pelletier, translated from the French by Anna Knight)

 

artist's profile