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‘Birgitte Lund’s canvasses are places where things meet. Acrylic painted areas, pieces of paper, liquid rubber and other fluids – an imprint of organic structure. They meet on the canvas and attempt to unite in a composition; an abstract collage. The works are often constructed around areas that divide the canvas into horizontal bands, as in the series “Psychedelic Landscapes”. Some are immediately beautiful colour compositions in the tradition of Mark Rothko. But strict beauty must be challenged – and it is – with things that don’t fit in – things that are possibly even irritating, ugly and nasty. That’s the way it is with visual dissonance. The dissonances are not, however, allowed to just stand there and irritate. They are made
 to communicate with each other and with the background, by adding new layers and bridges so that balance is restored, but the dissonance remains. As a rule, the dissonances are not this harsh. They function as tension fields in the picture that make its beauty long-lasting.’ (Torben Sangild)

“My work revolves around the discovery of pictorial landscapes – like an archeologist uncovering but in reverse order. The landscapes are built up through many textured layers. Tracks are left behind on absorbent or repellent surfaces. Lines, marks, calcified figures from my graphical sketches, drawings and earlier works form landmarks on the surface.” (Birgitte Lund)

(5 – 9 March 2021)

 

‘Birgitte Lund’s canvasses are places where things meet. Acrylic painted areas, pieces of paper, liquid rubber and other fluids – an imprint of organic structure. They meet on the canvas and attempt to unite in a composition; an abstract collage. The works are often constructed around areas that divide the canvas into horizontal bands, as in the series “Psychedelic Landscapes”. Some are immediately beautiful colour compositions in the tradition of Mark Rothko. But strict beauty must be challenged – and it is – with things that don’t fit in – things that are possibly even irritating, ugly and nasty. That’s the way it is with visual dissonance. The dissonances are not, however, allowed to just stand there and irritate. They are made
 to communicate with each other and with the background, by adding new layers and bridges so that balance is restored, but the dissonance remains. As a rule, the dissonances are not this harsh. They function as tension fields in the picture that make its beauty long-lasting.’ (Torben Sangild)

“My work revolves around the discovery of pictorial landscapes – like an archeologist uncovering but in reverse order. The landscapes are built up through many textured layers. Tracks are left behind on absorbent or repellent surfaces. Lines, marks, calcified figures from my graphical sketches, drawings and earlier works form landmarks on the surface.” (Birgitte Lund)

 

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(Photo: Stuart McIntyre)